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Please don't hesitate to contact us if you have any questions, comments or messages.

Please note that we can reply only to requests in English!

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Newsletter No. 1/2016

news around gender and pay ...

This newsletter is part of the project “equal pacE”. equal pacE is co-funded by the PROGRESS programme of the European Union. The project consortium is also financially supported by its associate partner the German Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth (BMFSFJ).

What is equal pacE?

equal pacE stands for “a web tool-based equal gender pay analysis for a competitive Europe”. It is a project that aims to provide and promote a software (equal pacE web tool) for companies to voluntarily check for a potential gender pay gap and its causes. In times of demographic change and an increasing lack of skilled labour in various sectors, companies can also benefit from the equal pacE web tool, e.g. by identifying upcoming shortages of skilled workers. Access to the equal pacE project is granted via the official website www.equal-pace.eu and is free of charge.

European Commission affirms its goal to reduce gender wage inequality

On this years’ International Women’s Day on March 8, the European Commission (EC) emphasized its goal to tackle the gender pay gap as one of the priority areas in their engagement for promoting gender equality. In this context, the EC recently published a report on equality between women and men which also includes a strong focus on gender pay equality. The study gives an overview about the current situation in the EU and sheds light on activities of the EC and its member states. For example, it refers to a toolkit in Cyprus to overcome gender stereotyping in schools and a Girls Day MINI, which took place in Austria for the first time in 2015. The latter gives girls aged between four and six years the opportunity to learn about technical and scientific phenomena at the start of their education.

Furthermore, some analysis tools are highlighted. One is the equal pace webtool which is available in five languages (English, Finnish, French, Polish and Dutch) and can be accessed via http://www.equal-pace.eu. Further practical examples are two online tools for the analysis of the gender pay gap in companies that were launched in Portugal in 2015. These allow companies to quantify the pay gap between female and male employees, and to rise awareness of the underlying causes to enable companies to reduce gender pay inequality.

Please find more information in the Report on equality between women and men 2015, including a broad data appendix.

Magnitude and impact factors of the Gender Pay Gap in EU countries

Recently, on behalf of the European Commission a new study about the causes of the gender pay gap in the EU was published. A comprehensive analysis of the gender pay gap is performed by using two different international data sources – one is the Structure of Earnings Survey 2010, and one is the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC) for the year 2013. The cross-sectional analyses provide comprehensive data and, particularly, show the results of decomposition analyses to identify the most relevant drivers of the gender pay gap at country level. Among others, the report shows that not only the raw gender gaps vary across Europe but also the explained parts of the pay gaps. In detail, the explanatory power of many factors, such as hours of work, the industry sector and occupation vary among European countries. However, in almost all countries remains a relevant unexplained gender pay gap, i.e. which was largest in Estonia, Lithuania and the Czech Republic (according to EU-SILC data for 2013). In addition, the data also show that the remaining unexplained gender pay gaps are higher for some countries than their average pay gaps.

Finally, the report concludes that because of its rich personal and household variable data set, EU-SILC can yield additional insights and improve the understanding of the gender pay gap. Among other drivers of the pay gap the sorting of male and female workers into industries of different pay levels is seen as a major contributing factor. Regarding the results, the authors stress that they derived their conclusion merely from the working population and that the findings could change when incorporating differences between men and women to enter the labour force.

Please find more information in the report (Magnitude and Impact Factors of the Gender Pay Gap in EU Countries). The study also provides country fiches for each single country which can be found here.

Please do not hesitate to let us know your comments and suggestions via our feedback form available here.

Latest news…

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Project partners

equal pacE is jointly carried out by the Cologne Institute for Economic Research (IW Köln), PMSG PersonalMarkt Services and Roland Berger. equal pacE is co-funded by the PROGRESS programme of the European Union. The consortium is also financially supported by its associate partner the German Federal Ministry for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth (BMFSFJ).